How Closing a Credit Card Account Affects Your Credit Score

Do you remember the excitement surrounding your first credit card? You probably applied for a credit card when you went to college or maybe your parents offered some advice. Either way, you’ve had that card since your teens or early 20s and it’s probably not the greatest card in your wallet. It might have a high interest rate, no rewards or a lofty annual fee.

Once you starting building good credit you were likely offered better credit cards. Your interest rates are lower, you probably don’t have an annual fee or a it’s a low fee, and you probably have access to airline miles or cash back rewards. So, why keep the card that is no longer serving you?

How will closing the accounts affect my credit?

The important thing to remember is that when you make the decision to close a credit card account you’re reducing your credit utilization rate. Remember that credit utilization accounts for 30 percent of your total score calculation. You’ll need reduce your spending habits when you close a credit card account or you’re likely to go over the recommended 30 percent utilization rate causing your credit score to take a nose dive.

The average age of your credit accounts is another important factor for your credit score. This is two-fold. If you’re newer to credit, it’s best to keep old cards open because they remain on your credit for 10 years. That card, though rarely used, is actually helping your credit – especially if you have good payment history. Closing it could hurt your credit far worse than someone who has been building their credit for more than a decade.

So, what can I do?

If you have a high interest rate or a large annual fee, try negotiating with your credit card provider. Sometimes if you tell them you are considering cancelling the card due to high fees, etc, they may work with you. It costs them far more money to acquire a new customer than it would cost them to waive your annual fee or lower your interest rate.

Sometimes you have to close a card. If it’s costing you money because the credit card company won’t negotiate a waived or lower annual fee, it doesn’t make sense to keep it. Your credit might take a hit, but it will recover. You can’t however, recover lost funds due to annual fees for a card you don’t use.

Closing a credit account should not be taken lightly. Make sure to consider the factors listed above before you close your accounts.

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Personal Finances Is All About Breaking Bad Habits And Creating New Ones

People are often tempted to give unsolicited advice to others about the best way to manage finances. You’ll come across ideas that work and get you places, but often people are offering up such generalized advice. Trying to put together bits of information and use it in a meaningful way is not usually the best plan, as some of the information may be flawed and other parts confusing.

How can you take good care of your money and your finances so that you do not end up frittering away your savings on things you don’t need?

Generally, the problem is that most people lack a good understanding of just how important saving for the future is. Most people are going to do everything else with their money first before they even think about saving. Although saving in this way is better than not saving at all, it is in fact a highly ineffective way to build any kind of financial independence or security.

Managing Your Personal Finances

If you want to save money for the future, you’ll want these tips to help you on your plan. Many people who practice these methods are surprised at how easy they are to follow.

Simply set aside 20% of your paycheck.

Just reverse your spending and saving habits, instead of putting away your savings after you spent what you thought you needed from your income. Take 20 percent of your earnings first and put it towards savings before spending it all. Make sure to deposit this money as soon as you get paid. Whatever is left after the 20 percent has been saved can then go to paying bills, buying groceries and even getting yourself a new pair of shoes.

This method ensures that you’ll have the cash on hand that you need for your future and helps you to be more effective when you develop your budget. It’s a good feeling when you know that you have cash on hand for emergencies.

Keep Things Simple

There are too many people who are going to look at the latest gadgets and get wooed. You cannot let others around you dictate what you are doing with the money that is in hand. You want to buy the latest iPhone, but there is something you must ask yourself. Think about it, do you really need to spend the money on one?

Is there something in the newer model that is not there in your present one? There is no shame in being rewarded with luxurious items, but you need to keep it under control. You should never forego important expenses to purchase luxuries, and your twenty percent savings rule mustn’t be violated.

You Want Cash Over Credit

Don’t fall for fancy credit card marketing. So many people end up with huge debt due to starting to buy small items using their credit cards. It’s easy to get lured into the trap that a $50 purchase won’t wreak financial damage in the future because it can be paid off within the month. Actually, once the billing cycle rolls around, you are probably like most people who just pay the minimum amount of money towards the bill, making that $50 dress cost close to $100 in interest.

Try to use cash whenever possible. Save your credit cards for emergencies only. Replacing your credit cards with debit cards is an even better idea if possible.

Taking charge of a budget and getting your finances in order is simple. You just need to create good new habits to replace the bad old ones.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9557087